Local handicrafts and artisanal items to pick up on your trip

Anime and Manga
Japanese manga (comic books) and anime (cartoons) have a devoted following among kids worldwide. The Shibuya shopping district features two stores with impressive collections, including figurines and collectibles: Mandarake, 31-2 Udagawa, and NHK Studio Park, 2-2-1 Jinnan.

Ceramics
Japan has an illustrious history of ceramic making, going back to the Jomon period (10,000 years ago). Shops around the city sell work from many traditions, including Bizen, raku, and Imari ware.

Clothing
Look for today’s fashions from houses like Yohji Yamamoto, Kenzo, and Comme des Garçons or traditional garb like kimono, and happi (short coats). Do-it-yourselfers can find used fabrics, including kimono.

Plastic Food Models
The public can purchase plastic models of noodles, sushi, pizzas, and more—just like the ones in the city’s restaurant windows—in the Kappabashi district, about ten minutes’ walk west of Asakusa.

Sake
Japan’s national drink. The daiginjo style is considered the most refined. Sake is traditionally sold in half-gallon (1.8 liter) bottles, although smaller, more travel-friendly bottles are also available.

Woodblock Prints
Original prints by masters such as Hiroshige and Hokusai are hard to find and expensive if you do, but reproductions are widely available at museum gift shops and souvenir stores.

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