Photo: Khasi speakers

Kyntiahlang Ryngnga (standing) and Arabian Shabong (sitting) are speakers of Khasi.

Photograph by Chris Rainier

The first Enduring Voices Language Revitalization Workshop for Northeast India was held in Shillong, Meghalaya, India, on December 17, 2011. Representing National Geographic Society were Fellows Dr. Gregory Anderson and Mr. Christopher Rainier; Dr. Gracious Temsen and Dr. Ganesh Murmu represented Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages. The workshop brought together eight young linguists and language activists from across Northeast India.

Click here to read a full report of the workshop. (PDF)

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